Campbell Law School

Peter Romary

 
Peter Romary serves as General Counsel for QVerity, a company that focuses on risk analysis and management, crisis management, behavioral analysis, investigations, screening and training: the company was founded by former CIA and NSA personnel. He is also Managing Partner of QVerity Legal a law firm that utilizes the proprietary QVerity methodologies. He also serves as a Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Commercial Law and Financial Regulation at the University of Reading, UK.
 
Peter is an attorney, arbitrator, and mediator. He is a recognized expert and trainer in the areas of deception detection; interviewing; elicitation; negotiation; risk analysis and management; crisis management; threat management; and conflict resolution. He has worked and consulted for government and private sector clients and has lectured to audiences throughout the U.S. and abroad. He has published several articles and served as a contributing editor for the New York Times Bestseller “Spy the Lie.” 
 
Among other interesting career highlights, in 1998 Peter obtained, as sole trial counsel, a then world record $525 million wrongful death jury verdict. He also served as Honorary Consul for the Republic of Namibia, establishing the first diplomatic post for any African nation in North Carolina.
 
In 2002, Peter was recognized by the National Law Journal as one of the “Top 40 Trial Lawyers Under 40 Years Old” in the U.S.A.; in the same year he received the National Law Journal Pro Bono Award. He has been honored for his work by 14 states, and has received the highest civilian honors awarded by several of those states, including North Carolina's Order of the Long Leaf Pine, and South Carolina's Order of the Silver Crescent. Among his other honors are the Ellis Island Medal of Honor; the American Police Hall of Fame Honor Award for Distinguished Public Service; the National Crime Victim’s Bar Association Frank Carrington Champion of Civil Justice Award. When Peter was honored by CNBC, NASDAQ and others in the “Times Square Project,” for his work combatting violence against women, the British press reported that he was only the second British native to be specially honored by having their name in lights in Times Square, the first being Sir Winston Churchill. In 2010, for his contributions to safety in higher education, Peter received the highest honor bestowed on behalf of the 215,000 students of the University of North Carolina system: the UNC Association of Student Governments John Sanders Award for Student Advocacy. 
 
Peter is a British American dual national and holds both English and American law degrees from the University of Reading and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.